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UNDER THE SUN

Pipe dreams

— Superpipes, tabletops, rails and the numerous other jumps and obstacles in or around terrain park is a bonus. Though I’m not one who spends a full day going on the pipe or practicing big air, I do go to the area for at least two or three runs when I ski or ride.

Like most people, I’m no freestyle professional and I’m not turning any heads. I try to stay within my skill level but push myself a little bit on technical tricks. I also take a few dry runs on a new jump, just to get used to it.

Recently, the Steamboat Ski and Resort Corp. closed down some of its big air jumps in the Bashor Bowl, reportedly because a number of people were getting hurt. Don’t worry though; more jumps are planned for the near future.



Ski Corp. Terrain Park Supervisor John Asta said Ski Corp. wants to move the boardercross track from Bashor Bowl over to Buddy’s Run where the old terrain park used to be a few years ago. There, the track can be longer and have a better pitch.

Then, some big air jumps will be built again on Bashor, using the extra space from the boardercross track to include some different-sized jumps instead of a couple of huge ones.



It’s important to keep bigger jumps open in the terrain park. Most people on the mountain safely use these jumps and enjoy them; also, local athletes depend on them for training.

But some people don’t know how to jump a tabletop or ride the pipe, which can lead to injury and even death.

It’s important for skiers and riders to accept their skill level on all parts of the mountain, but most importantly in terrain parks. Just because some people are flying four feet above the 15-foot wall of the superpipe, or someone “goes big” and pulls off a 540-degree twist off a big jump, doesn’t mean everyone can or even has to.

As long as you watch out for the safety of the people around you, it is OK to “go small.” In fact, for many people who ski only a few days out of the year, or rarely let their feet leave the ground, it’s nearly imperative to “go small.”

It’s also the responsibility of the people who can “go big” to be cool with the population of people who “go small.”

From what I’ve seen at Bashor Bowl, most of the locals are positive. But it wouldn’t hurt anyone to try harder to tell a wide-eyed tourist standing at the top of huge tabletop jump that it is OK to go small. It’s also OK for locals to give a few pointers to ensure less-experienced snow riders act safely.

The more people enjoying terrain parks and the less people getting hurt means a better chance for additions and new terrain.Superpipes, tabletops, rails and the numerous other jumps and obstacles in or around terrain park is a bonus. Though I’m not one who spends a full day going on the pipe or practicing big air, I do go to the area for at least two or three runs when I ski or ride.

Like most people, I’m no freestyle professional and I’m not turning any heads. I try to stay within my skill level but push myself a little bit on technical tricks. I also take a few dry runs on a new jump, just to get used to it.

Recently, the Steamboat Ski and Resort Corp. closed down some of its big air jumps in the Bashor Bowl, reportedly because a number of people were getting hurt. Don’t worry though; more jumps are planned for the near future.

Ski Corp. Terrain Park Supervisor John Asta said Ski Corp. wants to move the boardercross track from Bashor Bowl over to Buddy’s Run where the old terrain park used to be a few years ago. There, the track can be longer and have a better pitch.

Then, some big air jumps will be built again on Bashor, using the extra space from the boardercross track to include some different-sized jumps instead of a couple of huge ones.

It’s important to keep bigger jumps open in the terrain park. Most people on the mountain safely use these jumps and enjoy them; also, local athletes depend on them for training.

But some people don’t know how to jump a tabletop or ride the pipe, which can lead to injury and even death.

It’s important for skiers and riders to accept their skill level on all parts of the mountain, but most importantly in terrain parks. Just because some people are flying four feet above the 15-foot wall of the superpipe, or someone “goes big” and pulls off a 540-degree twist off a big jump, doesn’t mean everyone can or even has to.

As long as you watch out for the safety of the people around you, it is OK to “go small.” In fact, for many people who ski only a few days out of the year, or rarely let their feet leave the ground, it’s nearly imperative to “go small.”

It’s also the responsibility of the people who can “go big” to be cool with the population of people who “go small.”

From what I’ve seen at Bashor Bowl, most of the locals are positive. But it wouldn’t hurt anyone to try harder to tell a wide-eyed tourist standing at the top of huge tabletop jump that it is OK to go small. It’s also OK for locals to give a few pointers to ensure less-experienced snow riders act safely.

The more people enjoying terrain parks and the less people getting hurt means a better chance for additions and new terrain.


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