Tales from the Tread: Become a geocache hunter | SteamboatToday.com
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Tales from the Tread: Become a geocache hunter

Tips on museum's geocache

To find the geocache hidden at the museum, you must first reference the GPS coordinates and historical clues provided on the museum’s geocache webpage. You will complete the clues using historical information that can be found around the outside of the museum facility (Part I). Once you have completed the historical clues, the webpage provides a numeric code to help you create the secret phrase that reveals the cache’s hidden location (Part II). Happy hunting.

“There comes a time in every rightly-constructed boy’s life when he has a raging desire to go somewhere and dig for hidden treasure.”

— Mark Twain, “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer”

Geocaching combines the centuries-old love of treasure hunting with modern GPS technology. Participants use a set of GPS coordinates to find a geocache container hidden at various locations all over the world. Often, geocaching involves gathering clues, similar to the 160-year-old game “letterboxing,” which uses clues and references to landmarks embedded in stories.



Tips on museum’s geocache

To find the geocache hidden at the museum, you must first reference the GPS coordinates and historical clues provided on the museum’s geocache webpage. You will complete the clues using historical information that can be found around the outside of the museum facility (Part I). Once you have completed the historical clues, the webpage provides a numeric code to help you create the secret phrase that reveals the cache’s hidden location (Part II). Happy hunting.

The Tread of Pioneers Museum and the Bud Werner Memorial Library are now official hiding places for the geocache craze. Museum staff hopes to soon expand their geocache involvement by adding hidden caches at other historical sites around town.



The term geocache comes from the prefix “geo,” for Earth, to represent the global nature of the activity and terms used in GPS, such as geography. The word “cache” denotes a hiding place used to temporarily store items. The word cache can elicit visions of pioneers, gold miners or Indiana Jones.

There are currently 12 different types of caches. A typical cache is a small waterproof container with a logbook inside (and a pen or pencil). When the cache is found, the geocacher enters the date they found the cache and signs their name using their established code name in the logbook.

After signing the log, the cache must be replaced exactly where the person found it. Larger containers can also include items for trading, such as toys or trinkets, as is the case with the hidden cache at the Tread of Pioneers Museum. The museum’s cache also includes a surprise artifact to remind hunters of the days before GPS technology.

Geocache hunting has become a popular world-wide hobby. Though the treasure hunting game was first started by technology and GPS enthusiasts, the trend has spread, and people of all ages and walks of life enjoy the thrill of the game. Today, you can search just about anywhere in the world.

“Thousands of people geocache for a variety of reasons: to explore new places, to have outdoor adventures, to search for surprises out in the world. Whatever your interest, there are geocaches out there waiting for you. The most basic geocaches have the ability to take you to new and exciting places, while others may provide unique experiences to engage, entertain and educate on a wide variety of topics” said Roby Sherman, Front Range liaison for Geocaching Colorado.

“Many libraries and museums around the world have already discovered the natural fit between geocaching and their own missions to engage, inspire and educate people from all walks of life. Today, official Geocaches can be found near historic sites, world-renowned museums, and even within our very own library branches.”

How do you get started?

The only necessities are a GPS device or a GPS-enabled mobile phone so that you can navigate to the cache and a free geocaching.com membership, available at geocache.com.

Once you obtain your membership, visit the “Hide & Seek a Cache” page to enter your Zip code and search for caches hidden near you. You can then choose any cache location from the list, enter the coordinates listed into your GPS device and begin your search. Geocachers are encouraged to share their photos and stories online. There are many other levels to the game available once you are familiar with how it works.

To begin the Geocache hunt at the museum, visit geocaching.com/geocache/GC656X0_treading-through-history. There you will find the historical clues and all of the information you need to search for our cache. We hope you will join us in this fun adventure that combines our love of history and your love of treasure hunts.

Candice Bannister is executive director of Tread of Pioneers Museum.


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