Suited in pink, Fletcher eyes future | SteamboatToday.com
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Suited in pink, Fletcher eyes future

Steamboat Springs Nordic combined skier Bryan Fletcher catches air Monday at Howelsen Hill in Steamboat Springs.
Joel Reichenberger

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Why does color matter when it comes to jumping suits? Olympian Bryan Fletcher tries to explain then gets into how high-heeled boots may be a competitive advantage and how he plans to survive being a father while competing in Europe, all on our bi-weekly sports and outdoors podcast, “21 Pairs of Shoes: Steamboat sports and adventures.”

Find it at http://www.SteamboatToday.com, or by searching “Steamboat” in iTunes or any podcast app.

— Bryan Fletcher said suit color matters, and he knows you think that’s crazy.

“It actually does,” he said, referring to the bulky jumping suits ski jumpers don for their flights through the air.

Check out our podcast

Why does color matter when it comes to jumping suits? Olympian Bryan Fletcher tries to explain then gets into how high-heeled boots may be a competitive advantage and how he plans to survive being a father while competing in Europe, all on our bi-weekly sports and outdoors podcast, “21 Pairs of Shoes: Steamboat sports and adventures.”



Find it at http://www.SteamboatToday.com, or by searching “Steamboat” in iTunes or any podcast app.

“The way they sew the material together changes the speed of the material, the way it flies through the air,” he said. “We don’t pick our suit colors because of what we think looks cool.”



Choose to believe that if you want, but Fletcher isn’t leaving anything to chance as he charges toward what could be the twilight of his career.

An Olympian in 2014, the Steamboat Springs-born skier is aiming for big results at this winter’s World Championships and is plotting another shot at the Olympics on the snow, then preparing for a life-changing event off the snow. His wife, Nikki Fletcher, is expecting the couple’s first child this fall.

“I’m really excited to be a dad,” he said. “I was more ready than I ever anticipated I was.”

For Fletcher, the next two years of competition could define his legacy in the sport.

He’s already enjoyed some serious success.

He won a World Cup event in 2012 and, with brother Taylor Fletcher, Todd Lodwick and Bill Demong, was a part of a bronze-medal winning relay team at the 2013 World Championships.

He had another strong result at the 2015 World Championships, placing fifth in the large hill event.

Still, he hasn’t been on the podium since that 2013 competition and came away from the 2015-16 winter positively frustrated.

“Instead of trusting what I was doing and the preparation I had going into the season, I tried a little harder to get to that next level, and in doing so, broke it all down,” he said, looking back on last winter. “Once you do that, it’s really hard to recover going through the season.”

He did rebound to some degree, posting a pair of top-10 finishes at World Cup events in Seefeld, Austria, and another in Val di Fiemme, Italy. Still, he said, he can do better than that, and while he remains plenty focused on the opportunities awaiting him in the next 18 months, he has high hopes for the 2018 Winter Olympics in PyeongChang, South Korea.

“I’m just looking for a little better results at the next Olympics,” said Fletcher, 22nd and 26th in individual events at the 2014 Olympics. “I know I can improve on that, and I know I’m looking forward to it, but I’m also looking forward to enjoying the moment.”

A long summer of training and preparing for both competition and fatherhood await, but he does head into it with a little momentum. He won the Nordic combined element of the annual ski jumping competition on Monday in Steamboat Springs.

He was decked out in a hot pink jumping suit at the event, and yes, he insists, that made a difference.

To reach Joel Reichenberger, call 970-871-4253, email jreichenberger@SteamboatToday.com or follow him on Twitter @JReich9


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