Steamboat City Council to hear nightclub debate | SteamboatToday.com
YOUR AD HERE »

Steamboat City Council to hear nightclub debate

Council members to address homeowners’ appeal of Powder Room

Agenda highlights

5 p.m. Proclamation recognizing four Steamboat Springs High School students named to All-State bands; 90-minute economic development discussion facilitated by Roger Good

7 p.m. Public comment; first reading of ordinance that would add definitions and criteria to city codes for temporary on-site real estate sales offices; informational public presentation of Colorado Mountain College’s expansion plans; appeal by homeowners of city staff ruling that allows a nightclub use in Clock Tower Square, for proposed Powder Room location

Agenda highlights

5 p.m. Proclamation recognizing four Steamboat Springs High School students named to All-State bands; 90-minute economic development discussion facilitated by Roger Good

7 p.m. Public comment; first reading of ordinance that would add definitions and criteria to city codes for temporary on-site real estate sales offices; informational public presentation of Colorado Mountain College’s expansion plans; appeal by homeowners of city staff ruling that allows a nightclub use in Clock Tower Square, for proposed Powder Room location

— Clock Tower Square home­­owners will take another stab tonight at curtailing plans for the proposed Powder Room nightclub at the base of Steamboat Ski Area.



The odds don’t appear to be stacked in the homeowners’ favor.

“The e-mails have been rolling in like mad on that today,” City Council President Cari Hermacinski said Monday. “I would say that what we’re getting so far … is about 80-20 (percent) in favor of allowing the Powder Room to be there.”



Clock Tower homeowners have appealed a city staff decision that allowed a change of use for the space the Powder Room would occupy, primarily citing noise and parking concerns. On Feb. 24, the Steamboat Springs Planning Commission voted, 6-0, in favor of the Powder Room and against the homeowners’ appeal, sending a recommendation to City Council to allow the base area nightclub to move forward.

Planning Commissioner Rich Levy said last month that homeowners’ complaints were an example of “not in my backyard” opposition.

“There were no grounds” for the appeal, Levy said. “We see the NIMBY thing all the time.”

City Council has overturned Planning Commission recommendations on occasion. But Hermacinski said it would take something unexpected for her to vote in favor of the homeowners’ appeal.

“There’s going to have be some information that (makes me) really say, ‘Wow, that’s something that wasn’t considered before,’” she said.

Councilman Kenny Reisman said the base area is intended to be lively, indicating he also may need to be convinced otherwise by Clock Tower homeowners.

“I think a club could fit the parameters of vibrancy that we’ve created up there in Ski Time Square,” he said Monday. “It’s not designed to be a quiet area, necessarily.”

If City Council does uphold the homeowners’ appeal tonight, it would deny a nightclub use in the Clock Tower Square location, formerly an office, near the entrance to Ski Time Square. If City Council denies the appeal, the Powder Room would be able to proceed toward opening.

Also tonight, City Council will conduct its third and possibly final economic development discussion facilitated by Roger Good.

City Council hosted a series of public forums and discussions since November to gather input from the business community about how local government can help — or get out of the way of — Steamboat businesses.

They brought Good on board earlier this year to help focus economic goals, which have included a greater focus on existing assets, increasing broadband and telecommunications services, increasing efforts for a vibrant, supporting a year-round economy and more.

Reisman said the wide-ranging discussions have spurred him to meet with leaders of various local business sectors.

“I guess what I’ve learned is the constant need to make sure we on council have our fingers on the pulse of what existing businesses need from us,” he said. “We have to make certain that what we’re putting into place are things existing businesses can act on.”

Hermacinski said the process could help City Council prioritize its spending when creating Steamboat’s 2012 budget later this year.

— To reach Mike Lawrence, call 970-871-4233 or e-mail mlawrence@SteamboatToday.com


Support Local Journalism

Support Local Journalism

Readers around Steamboat and Routt County make the Steamboat Pilot & Today’s work possible. Your financial contribution supports our efforts to deliver quality, locally relevant journalism.

Now more than ever, your support is critical to help us keep our community informed about the evolving coronavirus pandemic and the impact it is having locally. Every contribution, however large or small, will make a difference.

Each donation will be used exclusively for the development and creation of increased news coverage.

 

Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.

User Legend: iconModerator iconTrusted User