Steamboat briefs: Extended spring lift hours begin Saturday at ski area | SteamboatToday.com
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Steamboat briefs: Extended spring lift hours begin Saturday at ski area

— Spring hours at Steamboat Ski Area begin Saturday. Skiing and riding will be available through 4:30 p.m. daily on Christie Peak Express. Burgess Creek, Elkhead, Morningside, Pony Express, South Peak, Storm Peak Express, Sundown Express, Sunshine Express and Thunderhead Express lifts will remain open 15 to 30 minutes later for the rest of the season.

Night skiing and riding hours also will change to 6 to 9 p.m. Thursdays through Mondays. Visit http://www.steamboat.com or check the daily grooming report for specific lift closing times and more information on spring hours.

Moonshine Ski and Dine fundraiser is March 6

The ninth annual Moonshine Ski & Dine fundraising event for Rocky Mountain Youth Corps will be held from 5:30 to 9 p.m. March 6 at Catamount Lake House. Those who attend will have the chance to cross-country ski or snowshoe under the moon’s glow and enjoy drinks, appetizers, chili and desserts. A silent auction will be held in conjunction with the event along with prize drawings and a Ski Trail Treasure Hunt. Tickets are $60. Anyone interested in purchasing tickets, donating an auction item or becoming a sponsor is invited to contact Laura Karch at 970-879-2135 or laura@rockymountainyouthcorps.com.



Steamboat Art Museum to host bookbinding lesson

The Steamboat Art Museum, at Eighth Street and Lincoln Avenue, will offer a bookbinding workshop from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Feb. 27. Students will learn the elements of bookbinding, including measuring and tearing the paper, stitching, gluing and applying cover papers and covers and spine. Some materials will be provided and some will be for sale at the museum store. Each student will complete a book to take home. The cost of the workshop, which will be taught by Barb Sanders, is $50. Call 970-870-1755 or email sam@steamboatartmuseum.org to register. 

Teen parenting workshop starting Tuesdays in March

The Routt County Youth Services Coalition is hosting its Active Parenting of Teens workshop for local parents of tweens and teens. The class starts March 3 and runs from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday evenings until April 14. The class is $60 per person or $100 per couple, and scholarships are available. The workshop is facilitated by Laura Cannone. She will teach methods of respectful discipline; skills for clear, honest communication; strategies to prevent risky behavior; tips on how to be an encouraging parent; and insight into issues such as youths online, drugs, sexuality, bullying and depression. Space is limited to 12 parents. To register, call Laura at 970-819-6142.



Steamboat Dance Theatre tickets are on sale online

Tickets for the 43rd Steamboat Dance Theatre are now on sale. Performances will take place at 7 p.m. Feb. 26 and 27 and at 12:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. on Feb. 28. For the Saturday matinee, patrons can receive one free children’s ticket with every adult ticket that is purchased. The Steamboat Dance Theatre’s annual show is the biggest fundraiser for the year to help fund dance programs and scholarships. Tickets are only available online at http://www.steamboatdancetheatre.org. Call 970-367-7807 for more information. 

VNA offering health class Mondays through March

The Northwest Colorado Visiting Nurse Association is offering a Well Body class from noon to 1 p.m. Mondays through March 30 at the VNA office in Steamboat Springs, 940 Central Park Dr., Suite 101. The class will help participants achieve their health goals with nutrition information, weight-loss strategies and tools to make lasting lifestyle changes. The class is free. For more information or to register, call 970-871-7634.

Applications are available for low-cost seedling trees

The Colorado State Forest Service is now accepting applications on a first-come, first-served basis for more than 40 varieties of low-cost seedling trees and shrubs grown at its Fort Collins nursery, according to a news release. Seedlings ordered now will be distributed statewide next spring.

Coloradans who are interested in conservation goals such as creating natural windbreaks, improving wildlife habitat or reforesting properties impacted by wildfire or floods are eligible to purchase the low-cost seedlings. According to Forest Service Nursery manager Josh Stolz, Colorado-grown species are adaptable, hardy and ideal for a variety of conservation uses.

“We’re very excited about our inventory options this year,” Stolz said in the news release. “We have new species, more size options and good quantities to accommodate virtually any conservation need.”   

Through a cooperative effort with Colorado State University Extension offices and county conservation districts throughout the state, approximately 5,000 Coloradans receive Forest Service seedling trees each year.

Seedling trees have many uses and benefits, including: wind/snow control to protect roadways and livestock; enhanced wildlife habitat and reforestation; increased property values; energy conservation through reduced utility bills; carbon sequestration; and reduced soil erosion

To purchase seedling trees from the Forest Service, landowners must agree to use them for conservation purposes only. There is no minimum acreage requirement.

For more information about the Forest Service seedling tree program, contact a local Forest Service district office, visit http://csfs.colostate.edu or call the Forest Service Nursery at 970-491-8429.

Program offers child care, English classes for adults

Community members have the opportunity to learn English while bringing their preschool children to a special children’s program through Integrated Community, which is held from 9 a.m. to noon Mondays at Bud Werner Memorial Library. Participants are asked to bring a healthy snack, and there is a $30 fee to register for this Colorado Mountain College class. Call Jen at 970-846-2076 for more information.

Steamboat’s Huselton is named to dean’s list

Katie Huselton, a 2014 graduate of Steamboat Springs High School, was named to the dean’s list at Colorado Mesa University for the fall 2014 semester. The freshman earned a 3.8 GPA to earn a place on the honor roll, which includes students who achieve a GPA of 3.5 or higher.

Ski Town Lions Club meets 2 Wednesdays each month

The Steamboat Ski Town Lions Club now meets the second and fourth Wednesday of each month at The Egg & I restaurant from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

The group is Steamboat’s oldest civic organization, chartered in 1923. Meetings are open to members as well as those who are interested in learning more about the Lions Club.

The Steamboat Ski Town Lions Club is made up of civic-minded men and women of all ages who identify needs within the Steamboat Springs community and work to fulfill them.

Throughout the years, the group plans or participates in numerous events and programs. It collects eyeglasses for those in need throughout the world and provides free vision screening for youths in Routt County schools and at health fairs. It supports United Way Day of Caring and the American Cancer Society’s Relay For Life. It provides scholarships for high school seniors and funding for local youth groups such as Rocky Mountain Youth Corps.

Highlight events include its annual Thanksgiving turkey drive, highway cleanup days, participation in the Rocky Mountain Mustang Roundup, Fourth of July Pancake Breakfast and Hot Air Balloon Rodeo. The club’s largest fundraiser is its annual Christmas tree sale in November and December.

For more information on joining, email ed@digthis.info or call 970-846-2484. For general information on the club, visit http://www.skilions.org or find the club on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/skitownlions.

Online litter survey open to Routt County residents

To help the Routt County Litter Solutions Committee better understand the issue and solutions for litter in the Yampa Valley, the Yampa Valley Sustainability Council is having a survey that community members can participate in.

You can take the survey by visiting http://www.yvsc.org/littersurvey.

Rocky Mountain Cheer hosts Tumble Tykes class

Steamboat Rocky Mountain Cheer presents Tumble Tykes, a preschool tumble class for ages 2 1/2 to 5 years old every Thursday from 10 to 11 a.m. at the Steamboat Rocky Mountain Cheer gym,1880 Loggers Lane, Unit C.

Participants must preregister. Contact Summer McParland for information at 727-424-1373 or srmcheer@yahoo.com.

The cost for members is $8, and nonmembers are $10 per class, $10 yearly registration.

All proceeds go toward the cheer program.

Steamboat Art Museum is in need of volunteers

Steamboat Art Museum is looking for volunteers to assist in greeting visitors, assisting in special events or working in the museum’s store. 

Shifts are 3 1/2 hours, one day per week Tuesdays through Saturdays during the summer and winter exhibits. 

Perks include getting to enjoy the fabulous art exhibits, meeting exhibiting artists at exhibit openings, free admission to all Saturday lectures during exhibit opening and meeting visitors from all across the country and world.

If you are interested in volunteering, call Dottie at 970-870-1755 or email sam@steamboatartmuseum.org.

Emerald Mountain School hosts after-school classes

Emerald Mountain School is offering three after-school Inspiration Programs during the month of December. All are open to students in the community. Jiu Jitsu and Create Your Own Adventure will be held on Mondays, and BookTrails will be offered on Wednesdays. Visit http://www.emeraldmountainschool.org for more information and sign-up forms. 

Ambassador volunteers needed at Howelsen Hill

The city of Steamboat Springs Parks, Open Space and Recreational Services Department is looking for friendly, outgoing volunteers to educate Nordic trail users about appropriate use of the trails at Howelsen Hill. Work hours will count toward a 2014-15 Howelsen Hill Nordic pass. For more information, call 970-871-7013.

Atmos offers tips to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning

Atmos Energy reminds customers to take steps in their homes to help prevent potentially fatal carbon monoxide poisoning.

Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless gas that is produced by incomplete combustion in home heating systems, gas ovens, dryers, fireplaces and automobile engines. Prolonged exposure to carbon monoxide can be fatal.

The symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning are flu-like and often include headache, sleepiness, weakness, vomiting, dizziness and tightness in the chest. Anyone suffering from these symptoms should call 911 or seek emergency medical attention. Stop using the suspected gas appliance immediately and call Atmos Energy’s Emergency hotline at 1-866-322-8667.

In a news release, Atmos Energy offered the following tips to help prevent carbon monoxide poisoning:

■ Hire a qualified heating system professional each year to inspect all natural gas appliances and venting systems in your home to ensure that they are working properly.

■ Install carbon monoxide detectors in the home on all floors where bedrooms are located. Detectors identify traces of carbon monoxide in the home and sound an alarm when carbon monoxide is detected.

■ Do not idle a car in an attached garage. Doing so allows a large amount of carbon monoxide to enter the home.

■ Make sure that chimneys and flues are clean and unobstructed and that appliances have proper ventilation systems.

■ Remove clutter from around gas furnaces and water heaters to ensure an adequate supply of fresh air. Change furnace filters regularly.

■ Do not use natural gas ovens as a heating source. The burning of natural gas produces carbon monoxide that is ventilated safely when the oven door is closed but is released into the kitchen when the door is open.

■ Do not use charcoal indoors for either cooking or heating. Burning charcoal releases carbon monoxide.

Make sure kerosene and other portable heaters are vented to the outside.


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