PHOTOS: Scenes from a year of pandemic | SteamboatToday.com
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PHOTOS: Scenes from a year of pandemic

Traffic along Lincoln Avenue in downtown decreased in the spring of 2020 as Steamboat Springs shut down in an effort to stop the spread of COVID-19 in our community.
The streets in Steamboat Springs were wide open in the spring of 2020 as residents were asked to stay at home and restaurants and bars were closed. This photo was taken just after 9 p.m. on a Saturday evening.
In the early days of the pandemic customers were greeted by signs like this one letting folks know the business was closed, and reminding poeople what was important to be safe.
In the first few days of the pandemic in Steamboat Springs residents flocked to local grocery stores hoping to stock up on all the basics including toilet paper, disinfectant wipes and hand sanitizer.
Nurse Tracy Dierksen gives Steamboat Springs resident Kim White the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccination during a mass vaccination clinic help Friday at the Steamboat Christian Center. The clinics, which targeted people 60-and-older, vaccinated 300 people at the Steamboat site on Friday, another 300 on Saturday. On Sunday the operation was moved to the Routt County Fair Grounds where another 300 people were vaccinated. (Photo by John F. Russell)
Nurse Meg Murphy gives longtime Steamboat Springs resident Vince Arroyo the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccination during a mass vaccination clinic help Friday at the Steamboat Christian Center. The clinics, which targeted people 60-and-older, vaccinated 300 people at the Steamboat site on Friday, another 300 on Saturday. On Sunday the operation was moved to the Routt County Fair Grounds where another 300 people were vaccinated. (Photo by John F. Russell)
Steamboat Springs resident Steve Speer gives a thumbs up while getting his COVID-19 vaccination at the mass clinic held Friday at the Steamboat Christian Center. The clinics, which targeted people 60-and-older, vaccinated 300 people at the Steamboat site on Friday, another 300 on Saturday. On Sunday the operation was moved to the Routt County Fair Grounds where another 300 people were vaccinated. (Photo by John F. Russell)
People line up outside the Steamboat Christian Center on Friday morning waiting for a chance to get the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine at Routt County Public Health's first mass vaccination clinic. Vaccinations were opened up to those 60 and older Friday (Photo by John F. Russell)
Vandals defaced these art panels, which were created by artist Jill Bergman to encourage proper safety behaviors in response to COVID-19. This photograph was taken shortly after the city installed them earlier this winter in West Lincoln Park in Steamboat Springs. (Photo by John F. Russell)
Diego Effinger, wearing a mask and gloves, serves up takeout at Johnny B. Good's Diner in downtown Steamboat Springs this summer. The year 2020 will be known for takeout and pickup as local restaurants tried everything to survive the challenges brought on by COVID-19.
Cars lineup outside of LiftUp of Routt County as the donation center reopened after being closed because of COVID-19. (Photo by John F. Russell)
People wait in line to board the gondola Wednesday moring at the Steamboat Resort. On Tuesday the ski area saw some of the biggest crowds of the season and Loryn Duke, Director of Communications, described it as the perfect storm where the holiday week and the biggest snowstorm this season combined with mitigation plans for loading the gondola and the chair lifts at limited capacity resulted in long lines, up to 60 minutes. However, she said the resort planned for those busy days and realized there would be long lines on the holidays and powder days. She said those lines were routed in different ways to allow people to stay safe and said guests and staff are doing a great job of knowing the new guidelines and following them. "There are obviously situations where there are people who don't comply, and that's why we do have additional staff out to help monitor that and make sure everyone is in compliance," Duke said. She is asking people to remain patient and realize that on certain days there may be long lines, and while Tuesday's lines were not ideal with the new protocols in place because of COVID-19 things could be worse. The good news is that Morningside Park opened Wednesday and that the resort now has about 65% of its trails open. (Photo by John F. Russell)
Wednesday was a cold morning for Tristan Palyo, who works security for the Steamboat Resort, but not as busy as Tuesday when the ski area saw some of the biggest crowds of the season. Palyo was one of the many additional staff members making sure that skiers and riders at the resort were wearing masks and following protocols. Loryn Duke, Director of Communications, described Tuesday morning as the perfect storm where the holiday week and the biggest snowstorm this season combined with mitigation plans for loading the gondola and the chair lifts at limited capacity resulted in long lines up to 60 minutes. However, she said the resort planned for those busy days and realized there would be long lines on the holidays and powder days. She said those lines were routed in different ways to allow people to stay safe and said guests and staff are doing a great job of knowing the new guidelines and following them. "There are obviously situations where there are people who don't comply, and that's why we do have additional staff out to help monitor that and make sure everyone is in compliance," Duke said. She is asking people to remain patient and realize that on certain days there may be long lines, and while Tuesday's lines were not ideal with the new protocols in place because of COVID-19 things could be worse. The good news is that Morningside Park opened Wednesday and that the resort now has about 65% of its trails open. (Photo by John F. Russell)
Marion Gibson, a longtime Routt County Resident, was surprised on her birthday as Jack Dysart, with Steamboat Folk and on the board of Opera Steamboat Opera, stopped by her window at Casey's Pond where she now lives to sing a few songs. Because of COVID-19 Dysart performed outside Gibsons closed window making sure the 96-year-old, was a Navy veteran, was safe from the threats of the coronavirus. (Photo courtesy of Melissa Lahay)
Melissa Uchitelle-Rogers, a registered nurse with UCHealth Yampa Valley Medical Center, works at the UCHealth specimen collection center in Steamboat Springs.
Cars line up in the Meadows parking lot at the Steamboat Resort for Wednesday evenings navigator Awards Ceremony. This year’s ceremony, which was held in a drive-up format because of COVID-19, honored Irene Avitia, as Young Business Person of the Year, Soniya Fidler as Business Person of the Year and Snow Bowl as Business of the Year. The Steamboat Pilot & Today and the Steamboat Springs Chamber present the Navigator Awards annually. This year marks the 22nd year these awards have been given out to businesses and business leaders for their outstanding contributions to the Steamboat Springs community.
Irene Avitia shares a moment with her husband, Adrian and two daoughters as presenters talk about her accomplishments at the 2020 Navigator Awards Ceremony Wednesday afternoon at the Steamboat Resort’s Meadows parking lot. This years ceremony, which was held in a drive-up format because of COVID-19, honored Avitia as Young Professional of the Year, Soniya Fidler as Business Person of the Year and Snow Bowl as Business of the Year. The Steamboat Pilot & Today and the Steamboat Springs Chamber present the Navigator Awards annually. This year marks the 22nd year these awards have been given out to businesses and business leaders for their outstanding contributions to the Steamboat Springs community.
Students returning Steamboat Springs High School for the first few days of class had their temperature taken as the coronavirus pandemic carried into another school year (Photo by John F. Russell)
An employee helps a customer at Ace Hardware in Steamboat Springs in April. The Board of Routt County Commissioners voted to extend a local public health order requiring all businesses to have a mitigation plan, among other mandates, as a way of reducing the spread of COVID-19.
Voters wait in line to cast their votes Tuesday afternoon at the polling center inside the Steamboat Christian Center on the east side of Steamboat Springs. (Photo John F. Russell)
Wes Hunter, director of pharmacy at UCHealth Yampa Valley Medical Center, draws the COVID-19 vaccine into individual shots to be administered on Thursday morning. (Photo by Bryce Martin)
UCHealth Yampa Valley Medical Center has received its initial allocation of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine. Wes Hunter, director of pharmacy, and Victoria McGruire, pharmacy procurement specialist, move the vaccine from the loading dock under the watchful eye of YVMC security manager Michael Bostock. (Courtesy photo)
A protester holds a sign reading, "We are all essential!" on Lincoln Avenue on Saturday, part of a rally against local COVID-19 restrictions that protestors say are killing local businesses. (Photo by Dylan Anderson)
Diego Effinger, wearing a mask and gloves, serves up takeout at Johnny B. Good's Diner in downtown Steamboat Springs this summer. The year 2020 will be known for takeout and pickup as local restaurants tried everything to survive the challenges brought on by COVID-19.
Routt County did not receive approval to transition to the next recovery phase amid the COVID-19 pandemic. In an email sent Thursday, the state health department said the county needs to reduce the number of new cases before it can advance to Safer at Home Level 1.
Leslie Gibson directs traffic as cars pull through the transit center as part of the Community Meal Pick Up that was hosted by the Steamboat Resort to support those that had lost their jobs because of the Pandemic. Across town the Snow Bowl Steamboat hosted a similar effort.
A sign at The Barley Tap & Tavern on Monday evening lets customers know the bar will be closed for the next 30 days, at the very least. The closure came after Gov. Jared Polis announced Monday that the state was issuing a public health order to close bars, restaurants and other public establishments to slow the spread of the COVID-19 virus. (Photo by John F. Russell)
Kindergartner Kellen O'Connell says thank you to his teachers at Mountain Village Montessori Charter School during a drive-thru, end-of-year parade. (Photo by John F. Russell)
Vie Rhodes, Director of Programs at LiftUp of Routt County, loads up a box of food that was distributed to an individuals, or a family in need as the pandemic unfolded in Steamboat Springs.
More than 160 people were tested for COVID-19 during two community drive-through testing events held Wednesday, April 15 and Saturday, April 18 at Howelsen Hill parking lot. (Photo by John F. Russell)
Patti Frick , a postal cleark at the U.S. Post Office in Stemaboat Springs, was hard at work during the eary days of the pandemic.
Marralee Figueroa serves customers at Ace Hardware on the west side of Steamboat Springs. The locally run hardware store has built and installed Plexiglas guards to limit their employees' and customers' possible exposure to COVID-19. (Photo by John F. Russell)
Snow Bowl Steamboat has provided 14,000 free carryout meals as part of its Family Bowl initiative. (Photo by John F. Russell)
Michele Lewis, a public health nurse for Routt County, is one of the faces of the frontline fighting the COVID-19 pandemic. (Photo by John F. Russell)
A sign outside the Routt County Courthouse in Steamboat Springs lets people know that the doors were closed due to COVID-19.
Students wait in socially-distanced lines outside the Steamboat Springs High School as they returned to a different educational reality in fall of 2020.
Officers like John Miller put on their maskes and kept working throughout the pandemic.
Traffic on Lincoln Avenue passes underneath one of two banners that have been displayed downtown honoring the Class of 2020. (Photo by John F. Russell)

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