PHOTOS: Emotions run high as wild horse roundup plays out at Sand Wash Basin | SteamboatToday.com
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PHOTOS: Emotions run high as wild horse roundup plays out at Sand Wash Basin

People heading to the viewing area of the Bureau of Land Management’s wild horse roundup line up at the entrance of Sand Wash Basin early Wednesday morning.
John F. Russell/Steamboat Pilot & Today
Wild horses share a moment while grazing just south of Moffat County Road 48 on Sept. 2 before the Bureau of Land Management began rounding up horses in this area of the Sand Wash Basin.
John F. Russell/Steamboat Pilot & Today
A wild horse doesn't let an itch behind the ear stop it from grazing in the herd management area at Sand Wash Basin prior to the start of the wild horse gather last week.
John F. Russell/Steamboat Pilot & Today
Wild horses kick up dust as they are driven through the sagebrush in the Sand Wash Basin toward a trap Wednesday afternoon.
John F. Russell/Steamboat Pilot & Today
An employee with Cattoor Livestock Roundup Company closes a gate after a helicopter drives a group of wild horses into a corral.
John F. Russell/Steamboat Pilot & Today
Those observing Wednesday's wild horse roundup gathered on a small hill almost a mile away from where the trap was set.
John F. Russell/Steamboat Pilot & Today
Jenny Meyer, a Moffat County resident, sits dejected on a hill in Sand Wash Basin on Wednesday as she watches a Bureau of Land Management contractor use helicopters to round up 107 wild horses.
John F. Russell/Steamboat Pilot & Today
Ben Brown, a ranger with the Bureau of Land Management, was on hand at a public viewing sight Wednesday in case emotions flared during the wild horse roundup.
John F. Russell/Steamboat Pilot & Today
Jenny Meyer uses binoculars while scanning the horizon for horses and helicopters Wednesday. She was joined by other horse activists, as well as documentary filmmakers who had come to witness the event. There were also officials from the Bureau of Land Management, including security, at the viewing area.
John F. Russell/Steamboat Pilot & Today
Helicopters work in tandem to bring in horses.
John F. Russell/Steamboat Pilot
Wild horses graze inside the herd management area of the Sand Wash Basin in Moffat County on Sept. 2 before the Bureau of Land Management started rounding up horses in this area.
John F. Russell/Steamboat Pilot & Today
Wild horse advocate Meg Frederick asks tough questions to Ben Smith, Northwest Division Horse and Burro specialist. Observers were taken near the horse Corrals after Wednesday's roundup in the Sand Wash Basin was completed.
John F. Russell/Steamboat Pilot & Today
A wild horse eats hay in a corral set up where it was trapped Wednesday afternoon in the Sand Wash Basin.
John F. Russell/Steamboat Pilot & Today
Stallions face off inside a pen after being captured Wednesday as part of the Bureau of Land Management's wild horse roundup in the Sand Wash Basin.
John F. Russell/Steamboat Pilot & Today
Wild horses rounded up Wednesday stand behind a fence of a corral in the Sand Wash Basin. The horses are held there until they can be loaded onto trucks and taken out of the basin.
John F. Russell/Steamboat Pilot & Today
Wild horses are held in a corral after being trapped in the Sand Wash Basin on Wednesday.
John F. Russell/Steamboat PIlot & Today
A foal runs through sagebrush in the Sand Wash Basin on Sept. 2 before the Bureau of Land Management began rounding up horses in this part of the herd management area.
John F. Russell/Steamboat Pilot & Today
Wild horses, including a foal, hang out with their band last week in Sand Wash Basin.
John F. Russell/Steamboat Pilot & Today
A wild horse leaves a pond Sept. 2 before the Bureau of Land Management began rounding up horses in this part of the basin.
John F. Russell/Steamboat Pilot & Today
Stella Trueblood, of Jackson County, a volunteer with the Sand Wash Basin Wild Horse Advocate Team breaks down Wednesday as Bureau of Land Management rounded up 107 horses.
John F. Russell/Steamboat Pilot & Today
A wild horse runs past activists in the Sand Wash Basin on Wednesday moring. The horse was by itself, and may have been looking to rejoin a band that had been captured the day before. The activists were there to view Wednesday's gather.
John F. Russell/Steamboat Pilot & Today
The wild horses in the Sand Wash Basin — descendants of Spanish horses — have made their home in the area for generations.
John F. Russell/Steamboat Pilot & Today

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