New BLM rules proposed for Emerald Mountain in Steamboat | SteamboatToday.com
YOUR AD HERE »

New BLM rules proposed for Emerald Mountain in Steamboat

Dog leashes are required, glass and most fires banned

The Bureau of Land Management proposed a set of new regulations to make it easier for rangers to enforce laws. The BLM is taking feedback until Sept. 17.
John F. Russell

For more

■ The Bureau of Land Management will be accepting feedback on the proposed regulations until Sept. 17. Suggestions can be submitted to the BLM Little Snake Field Office, 455 Emerson St. in Craig, or by calling David Blackstun at 970-826-5000.

■ For more information about working on the trails along Emerald Mountain, visit http://www.routtcountyri.... The general times are starting at 4 p.m. on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays; from 9 a.m. to noon on Saturdays; and all day Sunday. Workers post a trail map at the trailhead accessible from Cow Creek to alert workers where they will be that day.

For more

■ The Bureau of Land Management will be accepting feedback on the proposed regulations until Sept. 17. Suggestions can be submitted to the BLM Little Snake Field Office, 455 Emerson St. in Craig, or by calling David Blackstun at 970-826-5000.

■ For more information about working on the trails along Emerald Mountain, visit http://www.routtcountyri…. The general times are starting at 4 p.m. on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays; from 9 a.m. to noon on Saturdays; and all day Sunday. Workers post a trail map at the trailhead accessible from Cow Creek to alert workers where they will be that day.

— The Bureau of Land Manage­ment is taking comments until Sept. 17 about a set of new guidelines proposed for Emerald Mountain.



The list of rules should not come as a surprise to people who use the land, BLM representatives said, but it will make it easier for rangers to patrol and enforce rules on the public land.

The rules include a leash law for dogs, a ban on glass containers and a ban on any fire except in a campstove at a trailhead. Overnight camping also is prohibited, as is all overnight use except for hunters retrieving game.

Participate in The Longevity Project

The Longevity Project is an annual campaign to help educate readers about what it takes to live a long, fulfilling life in our valley. This year Kevin shares his story of hope and celebration of life with his presentation Cracked, Not Broken as we explore the critical and relevant topic of mental health.



The rules apply only to the 4,139 acres of BLM land on the western slope of Emerald Mountain. The area is accessed primarily by Cow Creek Trail.

“These proposed rules would not significantly change our management of these public lands,” Acting Field Manager David Blackstun said in a news release. “They simply give us better ability to enforce the commitments we made with the public as we developed the Emerald Mountain Management Plan. We want to ensure a positive and safe outdoor recreation experience for all visitors to Emerald Mountain.”

BLM acquired the land in 2007, and it has been working on a plan for the area since that time. Many of these rules are making formal the suggestions from that plan, BLM spokesman David Boyd said.

“We do need to take this step to get the rules so the rangers can better enforce that,” he said.

Rangers now can use general laws — such as laws against damaging resources — to enforce rules, but these new regulations will allow them to be more specific.

“It’s easier for them if there’s a problem with a campfire or overnight (campers), then they have the very specific regulations they can enforce,” he said.

Boyd said Emerald Moun­tain is not a trouble area, but it’s better to get the rules in place before the laws are broken.

BLM officials will be taking feedback on the suggested rules at the Little Snake Field Office, 455 Emerson St. in Craig, or by calling Blackstun at 970-826-5000.

Rotary Trail

Other crews continue to work on Rotary Trail on Emerald Mountain, with workers on the trail almost every day.

Trail worker Grant Fenton said crews are working on the trail starting at 4 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, from 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, and all day Sundays.

“It’s going great,” he said. “I think it’s really exciting because there’s wide community-based support, and a lot of people come out and contribute their time and resources toward this.”

He said the trail will be rideable later in the fall, but the full project won’t be finished until next year.


Support Local Journalism

Support Local Journalism

Readers around Steamboat and Routt County make the Steamboat Pilot & Today’s work possible. Your financial contribution supports our efforts to deliver quality, locally relevant journalism.

Now more than ever, your support is critical to help us keep our community informed about the evolving coronavirus pandemic and the impact it is having locally. Every contribution, however large or small, will make a difference.

Each donation will be used exclusively for the development and creation of increased news coverage.

 

Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.

User Legend: iconModerator iconTrusted User


News

The Longevity Project’s live event goes virtual

The Longevity Project event, sponsored by Steamboat Pilot & Today, has shifted from in-person to virtual. The keynote speaker Kevin Hines contracted COVID-19, and he will now be presenting his talk remotely.



See more