Looking back: 100 people have been X-rayed | SteamboatToday.com
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Looking back: 100 people have been X-rayed

50 Years Ago
From the July 19, 1956, Steamboat Pilot:

Missing Doctor Found

An all-out search for a prominent Denver surgeon ended abruptly Monday afternoon when the missing man, Dr. Mack L. Clayton, 34, walked into the Ralph Warrick ranch eight miles north of Steamboat on Big Creek.



Clayton, missing since 6:30 p.m. Saturday from his campsite west of Luna Lake, 15 miles northeast of Steamboat, had been alternately walking, fishing and sleeping in the uninhabited area near 10,000-feet elevation. Three search parties and a Game and Fish Department plane had been combing the area for him.

The young orthopedic surgeon realized he was lost shortly after leaving his companions Saturday night and built a fire and slept about a mile from his campsite. He is not a smoker but had a packet of matches with him and used the last one on Monday morning.



He stayed near the makeshift camp until 2 p.m. Sunday in hopes someone would see him. Three fish hooked Saturday night served as breakfast the following day and he caught 12 more trout Sunday that lasted him through his ordeal.

Sunday afternoon he wandered upon a blazed trail and followed it downhill until he came upon a tent, sleeping bag, two pounds of coffee and four gallons of jam that had been left at a site on Big Creek where the camping party had switched from Jeeps to horses for the remainder of the trip.

Dr. Clayton remained there Sunday night and began walking down Big Creek on Monday morning. He was none the worse for the outing and said his khaki jacket and rubber boots kept him sufficiently warm Saturday night.

He was in a fishing party with several other Denverites, Chuck Bunn as outfitter and Clarence Muhme of Steamboat. The party, including Mr. and Mrs. John Tweedy and William Dabney of Denver, left Steamboat on Friday morning for the outing.

Camp was set up near Mirror Lake at the headwaters of the Middle Fork of Mad Creek. Dr. Clayton left the campsite at 6:30 p.m. Saturday by himself to fish in another stream a half-mile distant and to cross a ridge to Lake Edward.

Mr. Muhme reported him missing Sunday, and search parties were organized. More than 20 men joined the hunt.

Conservation Officer C. A. Hurd and a group left at 3 a.m. Monday on horseback, equipped with two-way radio packs obtained from the sheriff’s office. Norman Hughes, Grand Junction employee of the Game and Fish Department, began an aerial search with a Super Cub Monday morning. Other parties were organized by Ranger Ray Bennett and Sheriff A.B. Ritter. Forest Service men began the search on horseback from Swamp Park north of Steamboat and the sheriff’s volunteers traveled by horseback from the Lowell Whiteman Ranch through Elk Park.

Dr. Clayton is an experienced hunter and fisherman and had been on many pack trips but this was his first outing in the wilderness area above Steamboat.

New X-ray program

Many organizations have made use of the special chest X-ray clinic at the Routt County Memorial Hospital this week. Nearly 100 persons to date have been X-rayed in the first program of its kind in the country.

The clinic began Monday and will continue through Friday. John Freed of Denver, skilled radiologist, will read and diagnose each film and his report filed at the hospital and with local family physicians.

Hospital Auxiliary workers are serving as volunteers to register each group and individual.

The clinic offers a complete service that will show up lungs, TB condition, ribs, heart and cancer, if in the calcified stage, hospital officials said this week. The X-rays are full size and not miniature films such as those being used in free clinics given at Denver and elsewhere. Those clinics detect only a fraction of the disorder, it was stated.

The local service is being offered for $5 to cover the cost of machine use and this service normally would be given for $12 to $15.

Auxiliary members have mailed invitations to all local organizations and many individuals and families have participated. Mrs. Homer Bash has been in charge of the project.

Articles from our archives compiled by Brent Boyer.


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