Local florists offer advice on creating Christmas wreaths | SteamboatToday.com

Local florists offer advice on creating Christmas wreaths

 

Local florists offer advice on how to make your own Christmas wreath this holiday season.

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — With Christmas quickly approaching, what better time to deck the halls, hang some mistletoe and add some greenery of your own making?

Whether the holiday décor is already hung or not, here are a few ways to capture that holiday spirit at home without spending copious amounts of money.

If you go

What: Wreath Making Class

When: 5:30 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 12

Where: Steamboat Floral, 435 Lincoln Ave.

Choosing greenery

Gina Knochenmus, owner of Steamboat Floral, said to start, forage or purchase materials like magnolia, bay leaves, berries and bows. Another option is to take a workshop on wreath making class offered by local florists like the one Steamboat Floral will offer from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 12.

Birch branches and holly, Knochenmus said, are also great options. Items such as a glue gun and glue sticks, in addition to bendable wire or floral wire, are definitely needed when creating a wreath.

"Some people like to cut their tree down and, then, with whatever's leftover they make that into a wreath," said Kip Tirone, co-owner of Tall Tulips Flower Shop.

Other greens Tirone said Tall Tulips uses for their wreaths are cedar, pine, juniper and even succulents.

"You can even make one out of pinecones and boxwood greens that are more dried materials and can be kept and used year after year," Tirone said. "A similar option for that is to use strictly pinecones with dried berries, cotton and moss."

Materials

To start, Tirone said to find a wreath ring that can be purchased at Walmart or made on your own.

"You could also use twigs and branches, then put greenery on top of that," said Knochenmus. "Whichever you decide, it helps to have a frame to go off of."

Dimensions

Knochenmus and Tirone agreed a 20-by-24-inch wreath would be the best size for almost every door. However, some like their wreaths to be 15 to 18 inches, resulting in a smaller frame.

Rule of thumb

"What we do is wrap the frame with two or three layers, so it fees like a solid wreath," Tirone said. "Then we layer it over and over with wire to keep working each layer, so it will hold it's shape."

"I like to start with whatever greenery you want as your base, then add that from largest to smallest elements with your berries being added last," Knochenmus said.

Indoors or outdoors

Add finishing touches to fill any leftover gaps with materials such as pine cones or red berries for a festive touch.

Living wreaths, Tirone said, can be great for indoors or out, but be weary of placing those in areas that often get a lot of sunlight or below freezing temperatures.

"If it's south-facing and the sun burns it, it will turn brown faster," he explained. "Same goes for if it is kept in below freezing temperatures. If it's not getting hit by the sun or cold temps, it should last all winter."

Accessorize

Some people like to add gold pinecones, silver berries or just traditional bows.

"Each wreath is so unique because everyone can add their own style or view of what they want it to represent," said Tirone. "Some will add silver berries or gold pine cones or even blue accents or other colored accents with the ribbon."

"It all depends on your creativity and what you want the outcome to look like — whether that's neat or more natural," Knochenmus said.

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