Letter: Natural spaces should remain wild | SteamboatToday.com

Letter: Natural spaces should remain wild

When people think of school, they think of textbooks and tests. But not our school.

From Sept. 18 to 20, the seventh- and eighth-grade CREW from North Routt Community Charter School went on a backpacking trip. Our class explored from Dumont Lake to Dry Lake Campground.

We set out with three teachers, Mr. Dan Kohler, Mrs. Sarah Chapple and Mrs. Libby Meyring and two volunteers, Kelly and Cedar Beauregard, who brought eight pack goats. Our backpacks were heavy, but seeing the natural beauty of Routt County was rewarding. Hiking along the Continental Divide trail allowed us the opportunity to swim, fish, camp and enjoy some peace.

We were out in the woods learning important skills and surviving without a warm bed and running water. We learned these skills by doing them.

Not everyone has the privilege to go on a trip like this. That’s why it is so important to know what you have when you have it, whether that be backpacking with your class or having a school that accepts you.

We love being outside. People get so caught up in test scores; of course that matters, but that’s not what life is about. Here, we test, reflect and then go outside. At North Routt Community Charter School, there is a good mix of work and play. We work hard so we can go rock climbing, hiking, skiing and even swimming.

It is proven that the best way to reset is to be outside. Our school values that. This is North Routt Community Charter School, and this is how we roll.

Many people in the outdoors are respectful of the environment. Unfortunately, other people are not so considerate. They trash the outdoors and cause problems. It is good for people to be in the wilderness so long as it is properly executed.

It is important to leave places how we find them. Respect the beauty around you. Even though many trails and roads being built would make it easier for the public to get out and explore, such as the proposed road expansion on Buffalo Pass, it would harm the forest and the creatures living in it.

Unchecked development of trails and roads could damage and kill our forests. If the wilderness is destroyed, it will no longer be available for future generations to enjoy. Changing the environment for ourselves and our recreation is selfish. Our natural spaces should remain wild.

Sincerely,

The seventh- and eighth-grade CREW
North Routt Community Charter School

Clark


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