Joel Reichenberger: By the numbers, Sailors had epic tennis weekend | SteamboatToday.com
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Joel Reichenberger: By the numbers, Sailors had epic tennis weekend

By the numbers

Matt White and Joe Borgerding's weekend broken down:

6 — Number of three-set matches played by Steamboat teams. White and Borgerding played four. There were only 25 in the entire 126-match tournament.

12 — Number of sets the pair played. All four matches went the maximum three sets.

120 — Number of games played. They only played one tiebreaker, but many sets were long.

77 — Steamboat's duo played 77 percent of the tennis possible if every match had gone as long as possible.

132 — Only one team played more, a third-place No. 4 doubles team from Niwot.

— Steamboat Springs High School tennis players Matt White and Joe Borgerding didn’t have the state tennis tournament they were hoping for, losing in their first consolation match after having advanced as far as the championship semifinals.

By the numbers

Matt White and Joe Borgerding’s weekend broken down:

6 — Number of three-set matches played by Steamboat teams. White and Borgerding played four. There were only 25 in the entire 126-match tournament.



12 — Number of sets the pair played. All four matches went the maximum three sets.

120 — Number of games played. They only played one tiebreaker, but many sets were long.

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77 — Steamboat’s duo played 77 percent of the tennis possible if every match had gone as long as possible.

132 — Only one team played more, a third-place No. 4 doubles team from Niwot.

They did, however, come away from the weekend in Pueblo with a unique honor: They were the best, most inefficient team in attendance.

In four matches, each of which went the maximum of three sets, the pair played 120 games of tennis in two days in Pueblo.

If the goal was to go to state and play as much tennis as possible, few have done it better.

Take full advantage

The most possible matches one team could play at the tournament was five, and White and Borgerding came within a scant few points of making that happen. Only a 7-6, 5-7, 6-2 loss to a Colorado Academy pair in the consolation semifinals kept the Sailors from their fifth match of the weekend.

They may have not have been complaining after yet another marathon match. Steamboat’s No. 1 doubles team was the only one in the tournament’s 112 entries to play four four-set matches.

The maximum possible games a team could play, if every set of every match went to 13 games with a 7-6 score, was 195. The Sailors team saw 62 percent of that total, but as they only played four matches, they played 77 percent of the possible games they could have played.

That’s a lot of tennis, a minimum of 483 points and 242 serves. (It was surely many more points and serves, as few, if any, games likely were settled in the minimum four points, and the tiebreaker surely lasted longer than the minimum seven points.)

If the goal was to play the most tennis, that’s a pretty solid rate of return.

The most dominant players, of course, don’t go to three sets very often, and, in fact, rarely even lose games. Casey Ross, the Kent Denver junior who won the No. 1 singles bracket, played just 58 games in four sets, less than half the tennis Steamboat’s pair got to play.

What a sucker. He played all season to get to state, then only played 37 percent of the possible tennis he could have while at state.

He clearly left some fun out there on the court, though perhaps the awards ceremony made up for it.

Niwot pair reigns supreme

Steamboat’s pair played 30 games in the first round, 25 in the quarterfinals, 33 in the semifinals and 32 in the consolation semifinals.

Indeed, few other players even came close to recording as much tennis as the Steamboat pair. Max McClellan and Jackson Kegel, the Dawson School duo that ended Steamboat’s season in the consolation semifinals, played 108 total games and had one extra match in which to do it.

Sadly for the Sailors, they can’t actually take comfort in leaving the state tournament having played the most tennis. In all, of the 224 singles players or teams that played in the Class 4A and 5A tournaments, only one played more tennis than White and Borgerding.

That honor goes to the No. 4 doubles team of Gabe Hyde and Manas Saini, from Niwot High School. They only logged three three-set matches, but did manage to play the tournament’s longest match, a 35-game marathon they won, 6-4, 5-7, 7-6. Their other two three setters were epic, too, stretching to 30 and 34 games, the latter of which secured them third place.

They only played 68 percent of their possible games, compared to Steamboat’s 77 percent, but played a whopping 132 of them in three days.

I imagine they slept well.

To reach Joel Reichenberger, call 970-871-4253, email jreichenberger@SteamboatToday.com or follow him on Twitter @JReich9


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