One year of COVID-19 in Colorado: What we’ve learned, and what could still haunt us | SteamboatToday.com
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One year of COVID-19 in Colorado: What we’ve learned, and what could still haunt us

Lessons of previous diseases including SARS, MERS and H1N1 flu not capitalized on to prepare for future pandemics

After a year of living with COVID-19, we’ve amassed an astounding body of knowledge about the novel coronavirus that sparked a pandemic, but we still allowed a third wave to claim more lives than were lost when we knew almost nothing about the virus.

Colorado, and much of the country, successfully kept the virus in check for months, only to watch cases explode again in the fall. Nearly twice as many people died in Colorado in the worst weeks of the fall as did during the virus’s early peak in the spring.

One year and nearly 6,000 deaths after Colorado’s first confirmed cases, it remains to be seen whether we’ve finally gotten the upper hand on the coronavirus. What we’ve learned — and whether we remember it — will help decide how many more people get sick and die, whether from new variants of the current coronavirus or from some disease still biding its time in bats or birds.



Read the full article at The Denver Post.


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