Health briefs: Haven barbecue and silent auction fundraiser is June 19 | SteamboatToday.com
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Health briefs: Haven barbecue and silent auction fundraiser is June 19

— The Haven Assisted Living Center’s annual Barbecue and Barn Dance fundraiser will begin at 6 p.m. June 19 at The Haven Community Center in Hayden, 300 South Shelton Lane. The event will include kids’ activities, live music with Loose Change and a silent auction. Tickets are $8 for students, $15 for adults, $25 for couples and $40 for families. Children 5 and younger will be admitted free. All proceeds will go toward repairs at The Haven. Tickets may be purchased from Karen Burley at 970-875-1888. They will also will be available at the door. To view a list of silent auction items, visit the Haven’s website.

Take precautions on ATVs

Ninety-two percent of ATV-related deaths are the result of warned-against risks, such as youth riding adult-sized ATVs. The Northwest Colorado Visiting Nurse Association and the ATV Safety Institute remind residents to follow the Golden Rules for ATV Safety:



• Always wear a helmet and protective gear.

• Never ride on public roads.



• Never carry a passenger on a single-rider vehicle.

• Ride an ATV appropriate for your age and readiness.

• Supervise riders younger than 16.

• Ride only on designated trails and at a safe speed.

For a young rider readiness checklist and other safety tips, visit atvsafety.org/YoungRiders.aspx.

Be aware during tick season

The Northwest Colorado Visiting Nurse Association advises residents be aware of ticks and tick-borne diseases during spring and summer months, when ticks are most active.

Tick bites in Colorado can result in Colorado tick fever, Rocky Mountain spotted fever and tick-borne relapsing fever. Ticks should be removed from skin as soon as possible. People who remove ticks from a person or a pet need to wash their hands immediately. If you become ill after a tick bite or exposure to ticks, seek prompt medical attention. Ticks are commonly found in wooded or brushy areas with tall grass. They may also inhabit rustic mountain cabins where chipmunks and other rodents may have visited. Wear protective clothing — long-sleeved shirts and long pants — and do thorough tick checks after being in areas where ticks may be present. For information on how to safely remove a tick that has settled into the skin, visit cdc.gov/ticks.

VNA reminds residents to protect themselves from hantavirus

The Northwest Colorado Visiting Nurse Association advises precautions when cleaning areas inhabited by rodents. Hantavirus is a serious, potentially fatal respiratory illness carried primarily by deer mice. People can be infected by inhaling dirt and dust contaminated with deer mouse urine and feces. Most cases occur in the spring and summer. The illness can begin one to six weeks after exposure. Early symptoms are fatigue, fever and muscle aches and may also include headaches, dizziness, chills and abdominal problems. If a person experiences these symptoms and has potentially been exposed to rodents, he or she should seek medical attention immediately. Hantavirus can be prevented by cleaning up possible rodent food sources and nesting sites around the home, work area or campsite. For information about saftely cleaning rodent areas, visit cdc.gov/rodents/cleaning/.

Take precautions with live poultry

Individuals should take precautions when handling chicks, ducklings, goslings and baby turkeys due to the possibility of salmonella infection. Salmonella can be contracted by handling live poultry, poultry cages and bedding. Children are more susceptible to the illness; children five and younger should not handle young birds. Individuals who have touched live poultry or areas where the birds live and roam should thoroughly wash hands with soap and water and clean any equipment or materials involved in raising or caring for poultry, such as feed and water containers. Never bring live poultry inside the house.

For more information, call the Northwest Colorado Visiting Nurse Association at 970-879-1632.

Support groups meeting this week:

• A bereavement support group meets from 1 to 2 p.m. Monday at Rollingstone Respite House. The group is open to anyone grieving the loss of a loved one. Call 970-871-7628 prior to attending your first meeting.

• A Parkinson’s support group meets at 4 p.m. Monday at the United Methodist Church of Steamboat Springs, 736 Oak St. For more information, call 970-875-1088.

• A domestic violence support group for women meets from noon to 1 p.m. Tuesdays at Advocates Building Peaceful Communities. Call Diane at 970-879-2034 before attending.

• The Steamboat Meditation Recovery Group meets at 5:30 p.m. Thursdays at the Buddhist Center of Steamboat Springs, 2250 Copper Frontage Road, No. 202. The group also offers a recovery-based yoga at 4:30 p.m. The group will explore recovery through meditation, book study and open discussion. Meetings are open to all faiths and addictions. For more information, call 720-670-8642.

• A cancer support group meets from noon to 1 p.m. Friday at Yampa Valley Medical Center’s Integrated Health, 3001 S. Lincoln Ave. The group is to teach cancer patients techniques to manage stress and create a holiday plan. For more information, call Sara Ross at 970-875-2731.


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