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Gravel pit request turned down

Planning Commission rejects earlier opening

— The county turned down a gravel pit’s request to expand its business hours Thursday night.

Precision Excavating, Inc., asked for permission to begin running its gravel trucks an hour earlier in the morning. The company currently begins hauling gravel out of the pit at 8 a.m. and wraps up at 6 p.m.

Dave Zehner said a 7 a.m. start time would increase his company’s productivity.



The Routt County Planning Commission rejected the proposal because it was concerned the additional hour would endanger school buses, commuters and pedestrians that share the same road Precision Excavating’s gravel trucks use to haul their loads to the Steamboat Springs or Hayden.

The pit stands about a half mile south of the town of Milner on the west side of County Road 179 between the Yampa River and Trout Creek.



Precision Excavating opened the pit in April. The county held several public hearings to ensure pit traffic and noise would not infringe on nearby residents’ privacy and safety before it allowed Precision Excavating to mine the pit.

“We’ve tried to be a good neighbor,” Zehner said.

Some of the neighbors did not agree with his estimation.

They were concerned the hearing would undo all the work that was put into establishing operational hours they could live with.

The 8 a.m. start time was implemented last year to keep gravel trucks off C.R. 179 during residents’ morning commute and school bus arrivals.

A school bus picks up children in Milner between 7:03 and 7:13 a.m.

“It is jeopardizing our safety,” resident Jim Pavlik said. “It is encroaching on our peace and quiet for personal gain.”

Zehner told the Planning Commission an 8 a.m. start time has cost his company revenue and efficiency.

Gravel trucks often don’t reach the job site for another hour, he said.

“We’re two hours into the day without a truckload of gravel,” Zehner said. “It doesn’t work.”

The neighbors said extra dollars are not a good enough reason to extend business hours.

“The potential economic gain does not justify infringing on the safety or well-being of residents,” Milner resident Vicki Ferguson said.

Only one member of the Planning Commission voted for extending business hours.

Wayne Adamo said it was not fair to keep Precision Excavating off the road until 8 a.m. when other gravel pits had permission to begin hauling loads on C.R. 179 at 7 a.m.

Precision Excavating, Inc., asked for permission to begin running its gravel trucks an hour earlier in the morning. The company currently begins hauling gravel out of the pit at 8 a.m. and wraps up at 6 p.m.

Dave Zehner said a 7 a.m. start time would increase his company’s productivity.

The Routt County Planning Commission rejected the proposal because it was concerned the additional hour would endanger school buses, commuters and pedestrians that share the same road Precision Excavating’s gravel trucks use to haul their loads to the Steamboat Springs or Hayden.

The pit stands about a half mile south of the town of Milner on the west side of County Road 179 between the Yampa River and Trout Creek.

Precision Excavating opened the pit in April. The county held several public hearings to ensure pit traffic and noise would not infringe on nearby residents’ privacy and safety before it allowed Precision Excavating to mine the pit.

“We’ve tried to be a good neighbor,” Zehner said.

Some of the neighbors did not agree with his estimation.

They were concerned the hearing would undo all the work that was put into establishing operational hours they could live with.

The 8 a.m. start time was implemented last year to keep gravel trucks off C.R. 179 during residents’ morning commute and school bus arrivals.

A school bus picks up children in Milner between 7:03 and 7:13 a.m.

“It is jeopardizing our safety,” resident Jim Pavlik said. “It is encroaching on our peace and quiet for personal gain.”

Zehner told the Planning Commission an 8 a.m. start time has cost his company revenue and efficiency.

Gravel trucks often don’t reach the job site for another hour, he said.

“We’re two hours into the day without a truckload of gravel,” Zehner said. “It doesn’t work.”

The neighbors said extra dollars are not a good enough reason to extend business hours.

“The potential economic gain does not justify infringing on the safety or well-being of residents,” Milner resident Vicki Ferguson said.

Only one member of the Planning Commission voted for extending business hours.

Wayne Adamo said it was not fair to keep Precision Excavating off the road until 8 a.m. when other gravel pits had permission to begin hauling loads on C.R. 179 at 7 a.m.


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