Actors share inside scoop on the Chief Theater’s Super Fun Steamboat Show | SteamboatToday.com
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Actors share inside scoop on the Chief Theater’s Super Fun Steamboat Show

Todd Danielson and Kasey Lane share a laugh while rehearsing a skit for the upcoming Super Fun Steamboat Show. The show will be held at the Chief Theater at 8 p.m. Friday evening.
John F. Russell

— Witty comebacks and satirical innuendoes are imperative to the Chief Theater’s newest variety theater act, the Super Fun Steamboat Show.

Featuring sketch comedy, music, singing, dancing, improv, juggling, game shows and a local celebrity, the show promises plenty of surprises.

After the First Friday Artwalk each month, the cast, comprised of locals from the Chief Players, Cabaret, Pirate Theatre and We’re Not Clowns, take the Chief Theater Stage at 8 p.m.



This week, however, the show will be at 8 p.m. Saturday and will feature dancers from the Steamboat Dance Theatre and the Jasmir belly dancers, along with an appearance from Paulie Anderson for the “local celebrity interview” segment of the show.

Never taking themselves too seriously and never afraid of any particular subject, the actors in the show are known for various roles that come from Steamboat’s peculiarities and personalities.

Participate in The Longevity Project

The Longevity Project is an annual campaign to help educate readers about what it takes to live a long, fulfilling life in our valley. This year Kevin shares his story of hope and celebration of life with his presentation Cracked, Not Broken as we explore the critical and relevant topic of mental health.



But who are these local characters, really? Steamboat Today caught up with cast members this week for more insight into the popular variety show.

Todd Danielson: writer, director, actor, creator of the Super Fun Steamboat Show

Explore Steamboat: How did you get into acting/ involved with the Super Fun Steamboat Show?

Todd Danielson: I was looking to create a monthly comedy/variety show and Scott Parker (“Chief of the Chief”) said that’s exactly the type of show he was hoping for there. The rest, someday, may be history. I started acting, very poorly, at a Steamboat Community Players production of “12 Angry Men,” as a bit of a lark with a buddy of mine. This was about a dozen years ago. Then I met the gang at Pirate Theatre, and I wrote and performed — still poorly but hopefully getting better —for about 10 years with them. Great stuff.

ES: What’s the last thing you do before you step out on stage and the curtain goes up?

TD: Take a swig of cheap, light beer and think about making people laugh.

ES: How are the characters you perform in the show like you? How are they different?

TD: I create and write most of the characters I perform, so I suppose they’re all like me. Sometimes my worst, sometimes my best. But they’re also a mask where I can say what’s on my mind without it “technically” coming from me. Hey, it’s just a crazy character I play.

ES: What’s going to surprise people about this show?

TD: Hopefully, almost everything. The goal is to provide the unexpected so people want to keep coming back, because you never know what you’ll see, and you’ll only get to see it once. And to do that while making people laugh. Keep it fun. Super Fun.

ES: Random Bonus Question: If you could have any superpower, what would it be and why?

TD: Definitely not mind reading. Can you imagine how terrible it would be if you knew everything people thought about you? No thanks. So I’ll take flying. It’d be nice to travel all over without needing airplanes or money.

Scott Parker, actor and “Chief of the Chief”

ES: How did you get into acting and involved with the Super Fun Steamboat Show?

Scott Parker: I was asked to be in the live western melodrama that used to be performed at the Ore House Loft Bar every year. This was back in 1998, and I have had the acting bug ever since. The Super Fun Steamboat Show is the brain child of Todd Danielson, but I have wanted to do a variety show since my days as co-owner of The Steamboat Mountain Theater.

ES: What do you do outside of acting in the Super Fun Steamboat Show?

SP: My day job is being the chief of the Chief. In my spare time, I help my lovely wife homeschool our three children, work on the Veronika Chronicles and go on adventurous hikes with my son.

ES: What’s the last thing you do before you step out on stage and the curtain goes up?

SP: Check my zipper and make sure that it’s not down.

ES: How are the characters you portray in the show like you? How are they different?

SP: Every character I play is an equal part of me and an equal part of the actual character. When I play a role, it is almost always a comedic role, and I have trouble keeping a straight face. Brian Harvey has often referred to me as Harvey Korman (from the Carol Burnett Show).

ES: If you could play a role in any production, what would it be and why?

SP: The Dude in “The Big Lebowski.” I just like his style

Kasey Lane, actor

ES: How did you get into acting and become involved with the Super Fun Steamboat Show?

Kasey Lane: I was born a Ham, or at least my mom always said that. Then, ironically, I married a man with the last name of Ham and so, now I am technically a HAM. 

ES: What do you do outside of acting and the Super Fun Steamboat Show?

KL: You can find me at the TV 18 studio winging it on the Explore Steamboat Morning show, and I own a mobile pet grooming business named Doggy Style. Admit it, you’ve seen it around, and you giggled because there is no better name for a dog grooming business than Doggy Style. Other than that, I am always in the process of collecting useless information.

ES: What’s the last thing you do before you step out on stage and the curtain goes up?

KL: Smoke a bowl.

ES: How are the characters you portray in the show like you? How are they different?

KL: There are bits and pieces of me in each character I play. I do, however, have difficulty playing shy people, because I just can’t find that kid inside of me.

ES: Random Bonus Question: If you could have any superpower, what would it be and why?

KL: The power to rig elections.

Patty Zimmer, actor

ES: How did you get into acting and involved with the Super Fun Steamboat Show?

Patty Zimmer: I took my first acting lesson at the Mummers Theatre in Oklahoma City when I was around 10 years old. The first production I was in was, “Tom Sawyer.” My strongest memory of this play was watching my friend accidentally fall off the classroom bench during a scene, and I almost wet my pants, I was laughing so hard. That’s probably when I found comedy. I have been working with these funny Steamboat actors since 2001.  

ES: What do you do outside of acting and the Super Fun Steamboat Show?

PZ: I teach yoga, meditation, Ayurveda and Nia, a new cardio-dance workout that begins this Saturday!

ES: How are the characters you perform in the show like you? How are they different?

PZ: Each show, we portray different characters. But, in a way, they all have certain aspects of myself — from fear-based hysteria to the calm reporter for the Super Fun Show skits.  

ES: Random Bonus Question: If you could have any superpower, what would it be and why?

PZ: Can I make one up? Super Buddha. To be able to bring peace, harmony, laughter and love throughout the world. 

Eric Leach, actor

ES: How did you get into acting and become involved with the Super Fun Steamboat Show?

Eric Leach: The first time I ever acted on stage was probably about 2002 in a Pirate Theatre Show at the Levelz bar in Ski Time Square. The show was called “24 in 24.”  It was about a powder day in the Boat. I wrote a scene about a ski instructor trying to ditch his students and get some pow. I was a ski instructor at the time. So, Brian Harvey, Doug Lockwood, Scott Parker and Kelly Anzalone made me perform the scene I wrote. I have been attempting to act ever since then.

ES: What do you do outside of acting and the Super Fun Steamboat Show?

EL: In my other life, I like to build stuff and coach the kids at SSWSC and do cool things with my 10-year-old daughter, Zoe.

ES: What’s the last thing you do before you step out on stage and the curtain goes up?

EL: I always drink a Red Bull before any live performance. This is the only time I drink Red Bull. I usually do deep knee bends right as the Red Bull kicks in and right before I go on stage. No, I am not sponsored by Red Bull yet. Maybe next season.

ES: How are the characters you portray in the show like you? How are they different?

EL: I guess in this show, all of my characters are unlike me. One is Italian, one is paranoid, one is a Republican and one is illiterate.

ES: What’s going to surprise people about this show?

EL: Costumes will surprise people at this show

ES: Random Bonus Question: If you could have any superpower, what would it be and why?

EL: The superpower I would covet is the ability to purify water to drinking quality with just a wave of my arm.

Sharon Gamradt, actor

ES: How did you get into acting and become involved with the Super Fun Steamboat Show?

Sharon Gamradt: I have a B.A. in theatre arts from Appalachian State University. I have been acting on stage and in film for the last 14 years in North Carolina and New York City. I met Todd and Scott shortly after I moved into town — they had me at “Hello.”

ES: How are the characters you perform in the show like you? How are they different?

SG: Well, we all get a little stereotyped according to our strengths and who would best represent each character.  But, of course, no two people/characters are alike, so it stretches us, which is so much fun.

ES: If you could play a role in any production, what would it be and why?

SG: Even though I got to do it before I left New York, it always has been and always will be Puck, from “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.”  Why? Because it’s one of the best roles ever written.

ES: What’s going to surprise people about this show?

SG: That it’s always new and funny

ES: Random Bonus Question: If you could have any superpower, what would it be and why?

SG: To time travel. I sometimes miss the 80s.


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